Beep boop love me


#1

The hardware discussion thread.


#2

Looking for recommendations for larger monitors for gaming.


#3

do you want 27in 1440p? what refresh rate?


#4

Dunno, that is why I am looking for recommendations.


#5

Can recommend 144Hz, its absolutely bellissimo my dudes. If you’re looking upwards of 24in, then 1440p is the way to go.


#6

this

144hz made me instantly better at shoot gun games


#7

144hz is very very nice

also really expensive at 27" 1440p

but u don’t want 27" 1080 because then the pixels are huge


#8

4k or go home


#9

Hardware eh

So the best nipple clamps I’ve found,


#10

Went with the 28" 4K.

Now to manage to get it to dual screen properly


#11

Can you link the make of that 4k 28 inch please.


#12

#13

Bought a scanner/printer Brother DCP-J562DW. $100 on sale. I have a bunc photos to scan and need to print some stuff. Its wifi and simple.


#14

Bought a new comp, for guests to internet and light gaming like world of tanks. I went very cheap.
A8-9600, 3,4g turbo boost, 4 core with 6 gpu core inside the dye. Its like having a 3 year old gfx card in your cpu. 16g ram and a nice new motherboard. $500 spent, can run games in 1080p in low to medium settings. Old comp got bricked when my brother tried to flash the bios. Motherboard and gfx card got cooked.


#15

I was thinking. Should I bake my old gfx card. Have you guys baked your stuff in a oven. How high and how long? I mean its broken already, it seems to fix some boards. I put it in the new machine, the fan is on but no boot. Google says 200c for 8 to 10 min.


#16

The method works in some cases, namely when the solder interconnections have cracked. But 195C is too low*, cranck it up to 240-250C to melt the solder joints properly. If you like you can ‘preheat’ the card up to 195C for couple of minutes and then increase the temp to 240C for few minutes, depending how fast the oven reaches that temperature. And if possible use the convection fans in full blast to make the heat transfer faster. Typical components used in electronics can withstand temperatures up to 260C, so dont overheat the thing. It would be advisable to have some sort of temperature meter in there as well.

*if the card is pre-RoHS, ie contains tin-lead solder with melting temperature 183C, 195 would be enough. But lead-free RoHS compatible solders have melting temperatures around 220C.


#17

I am still absolutely amazed.

Thanks to all the author of articles I read over various forums, and to Kari for the reply, I bucked up the courage as the warranty is out, so it either kill or cure, and I am ecstatic cos it cured.

I put my apron on, got out my screwdriver and stripped the cooling off the card, and baked in a pre-heated oven at 235 degrees C for 8-8.5 minutes.

My card is working again.

Saved me a packet.

Thanks again from a very happy gamer.

If your warranty is in get it replaced by the reseller or the manufacturer, else I would highly recommend baking your card. :slight_smile:


#18

Ok I am doing this. Jesus take over the oven and heal the card.


#19

Just don’t use an oven you use for food


#20

Yea, tried for the second time to make it work, this time I went to the bios and disabled the integrated gfx. It booted up, but only in 1240x1024 and with basic windows drivers. WOT was frozen like like 1 frame per sek. In display settings windows does not see the card. Only a adapter. I think the gfx card bios and shaders are proper fucked. Gunna check if I can flash the gfx bios. Doubt I put it in the oven now.